ENOUGH IS ENOUGH! One more time, just one more time, if I have someone say “Second Amendment! Second Amendment” to me as a kneejerk reaction, I might just have to, get MAD at them or something. This incident has really brought the snarky cynical bastard in me who comes out when the idiocy threshold has been crossed. Just HOW PERFECT is it that these “revolutionaries” were apparently going to take over a WAL-MART and use it as their base of operations. Plenty of food, guns and flag t shirts to be sure. A PA system with which to communicate with your fellow revolutionary who might be goofing off playing a video game or watching FOX on TV instead of preparing their next assault, or out flyering trying to attract converts. Also, just about everything you need to whip up a fine batch of meth in the lab where the garden center used to be.

Advertisements

Not being sarcastic here, but I am sorry your experience was so negative. No way will I even try to convince you to give it another shot, since you seem pretty committed. But I do want to make a couple of points. This game is different, in every way. I am not a huge gamer, have not played a ton of games, some of which I didn’t stick around with long enough for them to get their hooks in me. I call myself a casul, and wear my “casul” badge on my gear in DS proudly, because I are one, and I’m OK with that. Some games are an acquired taste. DaS is not, for the most part. What I have seen happen with a number of people is that they come in having been a total badass at other games, including sword and sorcery RPGs superficially similar to DS. They try to use the same strategies they used in those other games, and they try them again and again, and they fail and get frustrated. DS is its own beast. It requires thinking more than any other games I have come across, and this is what has kept me coming back for “mor deth, plz”. It took me a WHILE to get the concept through my hard head that I needed to learn from every death. It took realizing that sometimes, through pride, I would go back to where I had lost souls, not that many. Pride and impatience would result in me getting kilt again. By the same guy or guys often. And I would get more frustrated. After a while, I started using brain when appropriate, brawn when it was, thinking about what tools and equipment I had, or might need, and changing what needed changing. Had more success, got hooked by the exhiliration of beating NOT just the bosses and minibosses, but getting through an area where I had been thrashed repeatedly. I finally got it! Death is a necessary evil in this game, not something to get mad about all the time. It’s always MY fault, after all. When I started approaching each death as a learning experience, I started enjoying the game much more and usually, but not always, laughing at myself for being such a goon. I hope you come back, because it seems you want to like it, but just couldn’t. It is NOT for everyone. I read that before I bought it, and even though I am a middling gamer on my best day, gave it a shot. The gauntlet had been thrown down. It didn’t beat me, and won’t, as long as it takes for me to finish the damn thing.

http://www.reddit.com/r/darksouls/comments/27m6zz/so_for_the_first_time_ive_actually_permaragequit/ci25gyc

a little something I wrote for reddit about a game I am totally obsessed with, to someone who ragequit and uninstalled it.

original post http://www.reddit.com/r/darksouls/comments/27m6zz/so_for_the_first_time_ive_actually_permaragequit/.compact

Not being sarcastic here, but I am sorry your experience was so negative. No way will I even try to convince you to give it another shot, since you seem pretty committed. But I do want to make a couple of points. This game is different, in every way. I am not a huge gamer, have not played a ton of games, some of which I didn’t stick around with long enough for them to get their hooks in me. I call myself a casul, and wear my “casul” badge on my gear in DS proudly, because I are one, and I’m OK with that. Some games are an acquired taste. DaS is not, for the most part. What I have seen happen with a number of people is that they come in having been a total badass at other games, including sword and sorcery RPGs superficially similar to DS. They try to use the same strategies they used in those other games, and they try them again and again, and they fail and get frustrated. DS is its own beast. It requires thinking more than any other games I have come across, and this is what has kept me coming back for “mor deth, plz”. It took me a WHILE to get the concept through my hard head that I needed to learn from every death. It took realizing that sometimes, through pride, I would go back to where I had lost souls, not that many. Pride and impatience would result in me getting kilt again. By the same guy or guys often. And I would get more frustrated. After a while, I started using brain when appropriate, brawn when it was, thinking about what tools and equipment I had, or might need, and changing what needed changing. Had more success, got hooked by the exhiliration of beating NOT just the bosses and minibosses, but getting through an area where I had been thrashed repeatedly. I finally got it! Death is a necessary evil in this game, not something to get mad about all the time. It’s always MY fault, after all. When I started approaching each death as a learning experience, I started enjoying the game much more and usually, but not always, laughing at myself for being such a goon. I hope you come back, because it seems you want to like it, but just couldn’t. It is NOT for everyone. I read that before I bought it, and even though I am a middling gamer on my best day, gave it a shot. The gauntlet had been thrown down. It didn’t beat me, and won’t, as long as it takes for me to finish the damn thing.

image

Encountering RAW and Terence McKenna 15 or so years ago broke my head open, no substances other than knowledge involved. After all, knowledge, followed by open minded investigation, which might eventually become a sort of wisdom, is more powerful than ANY hallucinogen. Not that hallucinogens don’t have their place.
Challenged my insular worldview, opened my mind to paths of which I hadn’t previously even been aware, paths I still follow to this day. Not so much a purveyor of what even he sees as truth, more of a trickster figure. He in effect says to the reader, “OK, sucker, like 99% of humanity you have taken certain things as gospel your entire life. Like most (shumans? Humeeps?), you may have encountered certain things which have enhanced or even changed your essential worldview. To your mind, possibly even, some of these have been so radical, but the parameters of your worldview remain essentially pretty narrow. NOW, humeep, what if these OTHER things, which might at first glance seem totally cuckoobananas, might be true? Maybe even possibly, just a little? NOW what are YOU going to do with THIS information?”

image

In Flanders Fields 1915 John McCrae

Especially appropriate since this is the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the horrors of the First World War

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
      Between the crosses, row on row,
   That mark our place; and in the sky
   The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
   Loved and were loved, and now we lie
         In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
   The torch; be yours to hold it high.
   If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
         In Flanders fields.

image

Chichester Canal 1828 J.M.W. Turner



Chichester Canal 1828 J.M.W. Turner

Turner was one of the first artists whose work I loved and sought out. I was able to visit the Tate Gallery in the late 70s and made a beeline, as I remember, for the Turners (I remember seeing a Lichtenstein too, and being impressed by it, but pop art, at least in some respects, is easy). I can’t tell you what it was that attracted me to Turner’s work. I was very young, not at all literate as far as art goes. Maybe it was the ships and trains which figure in some of his better known works. But I think it was the light. Just look at his use of light in the above painting. In a sense it is nothing BUT light. The impressionists, rightly so, are acclaimed for the light which suffuses many of their works. I am not well versed in art history, but I wouldn’t be surprised if many of them studied Turner’s works and were inspired by them.

It is a special experience to be awake and alive each morning as the world wakes up. From absence to presence. It happens on a daily basis, and we have all experienced it, but it’s easy to forget how amazing it is. (image from http://danhawk.com/danhawk/2012/07/08/clover-sunrise)

antryump

Rumi Rumi

Rumi (30 September 1207 – 17 December 1273), was a 13th-century Persian poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic.Everyone have greatly appreciated his spiritual legacy. Rumi’s importance is considered to transcend national and ethnic borders. His poems have been widely translated into many of the world’s languages and transposed into various formats. He has been described as the “most popular poet in America” and the “best selling poet in the US”.

Rumi’s works are written in Persian and his Mathnawi remains one of the purest literary glories of Persia, and one of the crowning glories of the Persian language.

The words of Rumi are so deep, so perfect, so touching, that when one man repeats them hundreds and thousands of people are moved to tears. They cannot help penetrating the heart.

Buy The Essential Rumi

When you do things from your soul, you feel a river
moving in you, a…

View original post 185 more words

I am old enough to remember seeing Liberace on TV. the only thing that I have a Dad, who has his own truck, and he’s getting older. He has let me drive it once or twice, and I have tosay it has become a slightly diminished thing without her presence. I have my doubts. But in a way I consider myself fortunate to live in such interesting times,

Connectedness

A few months ago, I started a more concerted effort to study the Tao. Some days I am better at spending some studying than others. The more time I spend immersing myself in the wisdom of the Tao, whether communicated through books (Deng Ming Dao’s works are the ones to which I go most frequently), or through just paying attention to the world around me, the more aware I become.
I follow a few organizations and people on Facebook who post pictures of animals. I have a habit of saying hello to the pictures, and I am not ashamed of this. I also greet the beings, human and others, whom I meet out in the world. There is a family of some kind of water birds (small and black, with red beaks) in the pond where I get off the bus, and I make a habit of looking for them every morning, and greet them if I see them. Weird, maybe, but possibly the world needs more weirdness like that.
Yesterday, I was outside for a smoke break and noticed something crashing through the branches of the palm off to my right. It wasn’t a graceful descent, like that of a bird or a squirrel, so I went over to investigate. In the grass, looking scared, was a fledgling mockingbird. AL MOST big enough to fly, and after a few moments recovering its wits, that is what it tried to do. Wings weren’t quite working yet, though, so it hopped off to a safer place, away from the big scary human. I have no idea whether the consoling words I offered to the little one had any effect, but I like to think they did. Maybe it was only in my mind – I tend to think it was something more – but there was a connection there, and it only took the small act of caring a little bit for the welfare of another being for that connection to occur.
Our lives get so busy sometimes, and we get so distracted, that we fail to make these connections, whether with humans or with other beings, whether they are animal or plants, in our surroundings. I guess I have come to discover, and value, that it is these connections which sustain me, teach me, and help me to become a more responsible, respectful resident of this beautiful universe in which we live.